10 Things That Require Zero Talent

My sister sent me this a few weeks back and it really resonates. When I look at the qualities of fellow colleagues who’ve been promoted or are highly respected within their organization, they embody almost all of these points. They are qualities that don’t require you to have a special talent, work experience, or degree. Some of these points, like having a fierce passion for your work, a good work ethic, and a positive attitude come naturally for me. However, after reading this, I can definitely step-up my game on things like being on-time (especially in my personal life) more consistently.

What a great reminder to have at my desk each day.

10 Things That Require Zero Talent

  • Being on Time
  • Work Ethic
  • Effort
  • Body Language
  • Energy
  • Attitude
  • Passion
  • Being Coachable
  • Doing Extra
  • Being Prepared

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THE GIRL IN THE YELLOW CAB

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Resume Tips

Everyone has an opinion on how a resume should be formatted, the content it should consist of, and the order you should incorporate key accomplishments. I’m going to provide the main tips I followed when creating my resume, what you should leave off, and what you absolutely need to have. I’ve done a lot of research on resumes of GM’s, Directors and VP’s and have emulated their best practices:

  • One pager. I’m a believer in the one-page resume. It will force you to only include the meat and potatoes of your work experience and accomplishments. Get rid of the fluff.
  • Logo. Depending on the type of field you’re in will determine how creative you want to be with your header. I am in an artistic line of work, so I have a logo created from my initials that I use at the top of each resume. It’s something interesting to set apart from the rest.
  • Include a professional summary. Underneath my header, I like to provide a couple sentences to give a nice transition into my industry experience. For example: Creative global sourcing professional who thrives in product management across multiple brands with a focus on Men and Women’s Apparel. Interested in leading and driving a team to seamlessly integrate with internal team and external partners to ensure business processes are maximized and product is flawlessly executed through calendar deliverables. Available for travel and relocation. Right off the bat your perspective employer knows your strengths and area of focus from previous experience.
  • Experience first, college education to follow.  A common mistake I see at the top of most resumes is the college attended and year graduated. This gives your prospective employee a good idea on your age and the amount of experience you could have. Don’t let that be the lead into your professional experience. I list all of my industry experience first and then list my education. Unless you graduated from an ivy league school, I always lead with experience.
  • Bullet points: Depending on the amount of experience you have, keep your bullet points to 4-5 per job experience. If you have been in the industry for many years and have 4+ companies, make your bullet points 3-4.
  • Volunteer/Community involvement. If you have volunteer involvement from the past year, include it. Anything longer than a year isn’t as relevant.

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THE GIRL IN THE YELLOW CAB

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My 5 Travel Tips

I’m currently in Nashville, TN for the #CMAFest this week. Traveling the world is one of my most treasured passions and I’m so thankful to have a career that allows me to do so much of it. I grew up on country music and I never imaged my first time attending this event would be for my job. Throughout my travels, there are 5 standard tips I’ve learned to follow along the way to ensure each trip is as hassle-free as possible.

  1. I only pack a carry-on for domestic trips. None of this checking a bag nonsense. A carry-on forces me not to over-pack and I have all of my belongings on the plane to settle my anxiety about losing luggage and being without underwear or my toothbrush.
  2. The roll technique. I read this somewhere years ago and it’s a trick I still use today. When I’m packing my clothes I roll them up like a sushi roll. I’m able to pack more into my bag and when I arrive my clothes aren’t wrinkled! Genius.
  3. Download your boarding pass to i-wallet. Avoid the kiosk all-together and check-in to your flight 24 hours before take-off. Your airline will allow you to grab your boarding pass by sending it to your email and you can immediately add it to your i-wallet if you’re an iphone user. Security will scan your phone and it saves you time and paper!
  4. Collect travel-size items as you go. The worst thing has to be remembering you forgot travel-sized shampoo or conditioner at 9pm and you have to make a last-minute trip to Target. I take any extra travel-sized soaps and shampoos with me from the hotel so I always have plenty to grab when I’m packing a bag for work. You’ll need to plan ahead for your face wash and moisturizer, but I’ve had no issue buying travel-sized versions for trips away.
  5. Portable iphone charger. When you’re travelling and on the go, it’s common to not be near an outlet. I hate having to worry about my phone dying because if it does, I surely don’t have anyone’s phone number memorized. This little guy from Amazon has saved me multiple times when I’m out and need to charge.

fearless

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THE GIRL IN THE YELLOW CAB

 

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The Truth Is

The truth is, there may be 7.4 billion people on Earth, but it’s a small world out there. Whether you’re in fashion, banking, the health field or any field for that matter, your “world” gets that much smaller once you settle into your career. It can be a blessing and a curse, so if you know this ahead of time, you’ll be better off in the end.

Your first real job, one that actually pays you enough to start paying off that student debt, is one you need to treat carefully. You’re most likely in an entry-level position and this is the time to put any ego aside, happily agree to make copies when asked, and ask all of the questions you can.

Find your mentor, but be selective. Watch how they’re perceived by their colleagues and how they’re referred to in conversation. This will give you a good gauge of their respect-level within the company. You want to follow a mentor who is highly respected and liked. What you should know is almost anyone in a management position would love to take a driven and eager individual under their wing. Get them to believe in you and they’ll be happy to help.

I’ll give you my personal experience. I was at my first job for 3 1/2 years before I left to pursue an opportunity in Milwaukee. I had time to find mentors, and in my case, three amazing people that I really clicked with. My time was spent learning and growing from each of them. Shortly after I left, it was apparent I made the wrong company choice, but I waited it out for as long as I could.

I contacted my previous director, who was now also in Milwaukee, for some advice.  We emailed and spoke on the phone many times and she guided me through some tough conversations and decisions. She was protective of me and I was looking for direction on how to handle a situation I never imagined myself in. I felt relieved to know my thoughts were validated and it only helped to confirm my final decision to leave.

During this time she was also working up a little something for me, a position under her. This didn’t happen overnight, but I knew I needed to be patient. She wasn’t going to let me drowned. About two months later I was brought in for an interview. She pushed a rather extensive interview process to get me in asap and I had an offer a few days later. She literally saved me and I will be forever grateful.

The moral of the story is scope out a good mentor, make a good impression and they will forever protect you. They will open up their contacts to you for a connection or job recommendation, provide unlimited advice and believe in your success. It’s the most valuable business relationship you can make, so make it early on and make it good.

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THE GIRL IN THE YELLOW CAB

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Save It

Now in my late 20’s (ew, I just said that!), I’ve realized over the past year how much my conversations with my girlfriends have changed. Instead of deciding which weekend party to attend and whose house we’re getting ready at, we’re talking about mortgages, home renovations, investments and financial advisers. We’re all sitting together at dinner discussing our hopes and dreams for the futures we’re working so hard to achieve. A future that each of us has dreamed about for ourselves and our families. While they’re not identical, we’re all working towards one common goal – financial freedom.

To me, saving money is the most fascinating concept. Probably because it’s similar to a game—some completely win at it and some lose. These are your bills, this is what you bring home a month, this is what you can save. So, how do you achieve that and what are the opportunities to capitalize on your savings even further?

I’ve recently read the book, #GIRLBOSS by Sophia Amoruso, and a quote from her book really grabbed me, “When your time spent making money is significantly greater than your time spent spending money, you will be amazed at how much you can save without even really thinking about it.” What a genius concept! Stay busy, stay focused, and don’t let your income run you. It’s easy to get caught up when you get a bonus, raise, or tax return. The phrase, “burning a hole in your pocket” really comes to life.  Raising my hand, I’ve been there! Buy yourself something little, but special—dinner, a new pair of shoes, or a massage. You can celebrate the wins, but you can’t throw the party before you’ve even received the invite!

It may be the hardest thing you have to do, but keep on keepin’ on. For me, it’s so hard putting that money away each month knowing there are “things” on my list that I want to buy and enjoy. Of course, there always will be. But in the end, let your priorities keep you straight. Just because your big dreams take longer to achieve, doesn’t mean you should cut yourself short now. Save at least 20% of what you make. If you’re not there yet, start somewhere with even the smallest amount. You won’t miss it.

What you see and what reality is can be deceiving. It’s a tricky little monster and sometimes you may feel like you’re behind. The reality is, almost 60% of Americans live paycheck to paycheck. They couldn’t survive if they didn’t have income for one month. Think about that. *mind blowing* Shift your focus from what everyone else is doing to what you should be doing. Your future will thank you.

dream

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THE GIRL IN THE YELLOW CAB

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