Man Up

It’s something I learned early on – how to negotiate like a man. As much as myself and society would rather believe it doesn’t exist, numbers don’t lie. In 2015, women made $.79 for every dollar earned by men. If you can believe that, then you would also be surprised to know women receive more college and graduate degrees then men.* Women invest more money into their career and future, but their salaries are 21% less than men. Um, what?

Closing the gender wage gap has been topic of conversation among business insiders and politics, especially since our current president is raising two daughters himself. Early 2016 news articles have been buzzing about plans the government has to collect data of pay broken up by gender, race and ethnicity in an effort to control the diversity. How has this occurred and why does it continue? I believe a large part of it boils down to how we negotiate.

I read a great book during my first year in corporate, Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office, by Louis P. Frankel which discusses common “unconscious mistakes” women make in the workplace that sabotage their career. It was brilliant. Women by nature are nurturers – we want to protect and fix every problem that comes across our desk and doormat, we apologize for things we didn’t do, we’re always taking other’s feelings into consideration and second guessing big decisions. A few of my favorites:

  • Mistake #21: Multi-tasking.Just because you can do something, doesn’t mean you should do it.
  • Mistake #54: Failure to negotiate.Don’t equate negotiation with confrontation.
  • Mistake #82: Asking permission.Children, not adults, ask for approval. Be direct, be confident.

This book completely changed my mindset and allowed me to correct some common mistakes I was making. When I’m in a room with my boss discussing a promotion or raise, I no longer feel awkward stating the facts and outcome of my efforts. I’m confident, direct and unapologetic for my successes. Keeping negotiations factual is key, while removing all emotion.

One of my mentors is a male and I remember specifically watching him in meetings with his team and then with his superiors. The way he conducted himself in both situations was interchangeable. Business isn’t personal and I have to remind myself of that often. Don’t be afraid to bring your wins to light. Extra responsibilities come with a price, your work and time is not free and you don’t ever need to apologize for it.

youareyourlimit

Best,

THE GIRL IN THE YELLOW CAB

*www.ipr.org/initiatives/pay-equity-and-discrimination

 

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Two Drink Maximum

After the 4th of July weekend, I’m sure you are clear what a weekend hangover is. The clever ones took Tuesday off, but most of us in the office yesterday were walking zombies. We were trying to adjust back to reality of an inbox of emails and afternoon meetings after a holiday weekend. I was reminded of similar situations, like work dinners, parties and events that typically occur during the week that can leave you regretting your decisions the next morning.

It’s an unwritten rule to never drink too much when you’re on company time. Your co-workers will talk about it and the news could end up on your boss’s desk. There have been a few instances where I’ve seen some employees indulge and embarrass themselves, who would rather dig a hole and bury themselves alive then return to work the next day. One classic; a Design Director who balled her eyes out over her husband who cheats. She had to be driven home by a girl who reports to her. Can you imagine coming into work on Monday after that? You’re not making copies and coffee runs, you’re managing a team of people who all witnessed the shit show.

I helped with our Christmas Party last year and we specifically handed out only two drink tickets after a two co-workers became visibly belligerent and drunk at the company party. As much as you may want to, your co-workers and boss will notice what you drink and how many times you’re up at the bar. They will also notice you’re driving yourself home. Save the karaoke, booty-poppin’ dance moves for your weekend with the girls and remain professional at all company functions. Also, you can never call in sick to work the day after a company dinner or work function. No one is going to believe it’s food poisoning. I promise, the last thing you want to recover from besides your hangover is your reputation at work. My rule of thumb, keep it to a two drink maximum and remove that possibility from your life.

work.jog

BEST,

THE GIRL IN THE YELLOW CAB

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The Hardest Inverview Questions I’ve Been Asked

Interviews are probably the worst thing – right up there with giving a speech. Prior to an interview, you’re worried about what you’re going to wear, how long it will take to get there, parking, is it a panel or one-on-one interview, what questions they will ask, etc.  When you’re meeting with very important people, whose purpose is to judge your answers and personality in the small amount of time they spend with you, it’s an extremely intimidating situation. I always practice interview questions about 1-2 weeks prior to the interview by answering them out loud. If you’re well-prepared, curve ball questions are easier to answer and it helps me to keep my cool when I know I’ve done my homework. Here is a list of some of the hardest interview questions I’ve been asked:

  • Tell me what you know about the company.
    Tip: This is where you should know the name of the CEO, what products/services they offer, competitors, how and when they were founded, and any significant dates that play a big part in the company’s history. If you can tie in a relatable story about how you use their product/service, this is a great time to do so.
  • Tell me about a time you didn’t agree with a decision, but had to follow it. 
    Tip: You’re being asked this question to see if you’re able to voice your opinion in a professional manner, while disagreeing with a decision. The decision is most likely coming from your boss, which can be a difficult situation. However, it’s always important to show the interviewer you will give your input even when it’s differs from someone above you.
  • Tell me about the worst boss you had and why.
    Tip: Don’t trash talk your boss. Explain examples of what you believe represents a great boss and why.
  • Describe yourself in three words.
    Tip: I have these memorized and go in using examples that show as much variety as possible. For example: multi-tasker, diligence, enthusiasm.
  • What are your salary expectations for this position?
    Tip: I like to steer away from providing an exact number as you’re typically not aware of the benefits or bonus structure yet in the interview. However, if you feel comfortable providing a salary range make sure you’ve done your research (I like glassdoor.com and payscale.com) to find salaries of employees in the location I’m applying.

If you’ve had any difficult interview questions, I’d love to hear them!

confidenceBest,

THE GIRL IN THE YELLOW CAB

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10 Things That Require Zero Talent

My sister sent me this a few weeks back and it really resonates. When I look at the qualities of fellow colleagues who’ve been promoted or are highly respected within their organization, they embody almost all of these points. They are qualities that don’t require you to have a special talent, work experience, or degree. Some of these points, like having a fierce passion for your work, a good work ethic, and a positive attitude come naturally for me. However, after reading this, I can definitely step-up my game on things like being on-time (especially in my personal life) more consistently.

What a great reminder to have at my desk each day.

10 Things That Require Zero Talent

  • Being on Time
  • Work Ethic
  • Effort
  • Body Language
  • Energy
  • Attitude
  • Passion
  • Being Coachable
  • Doing Extra
  • Being Prepared

stevejobs

Best,

THE GIRL IN THE YELLOW CAB

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Resume Tips

Everyone has an opinion on how a resume should be formatted, the content it should consist of, and the order you should incorporate key accomplishments. I’m going to provide the main tips I followed when creating my resume, what you should leave off, and what you absolutely need to have. I’ve done a lot of research on resumes of GM’s, Directors and VP’s and have emulated their best practices:

  • One pager. I’m a believer in the one-page resume. It will force you to only include the meat and potatoes of your work experience and accomplishments. Get rid of the fluff.
  • Logo. Depending on the type of field you’re in will determine how creative you want to be with your header. I am in an artistic line of work, so I have a logo created from my initials that I use at the top of each resume. It’s something interesting to set apart from the rest.
  • Include a professional summary. Underneath my header, I like to provide a couple sentences to give a nice transition into my industry experience. For example: Creative global sourcing professional who thrives in product management across multiple brands with a focus on Men and Women’s Apparel. Interested in leading and driving a team to seamlessly integrate with internal team and external partners to ensure business processes are maximized and product is flawlessly executed through calendar deliverables. Available for travel and relocation. Right off the bat your perspective employer knows your strengths and area of focus from previous experience.
  • Experience first, college education to follow.  A common mistake I see at the top of most resumes is the college attended and year graduated. This gives your prospective employee a good idea on your age and the amount of experience you could have. Don’t let that be the lead into your professional experience. I list all of my industry experience first and then list my education. Unless you graduated from an ivy league school, I always lead with experience.
  • Bullet points: Depending on the amount of experience you have, keep your bullet points to 4-5 per job experience. If you have been in the industry for many years and have 4+ companies, make your bullet points 3-4.
  • Volunteer/Community involvement. If you have volunteer involvement from the past year, include it. Anything longer than a year isn’t as relevant.

success

Best,

THE GIRL IN THE YELLOW CAB

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